Ephemerality and Durability in Early Modern Visual and Material Culture

A few days ago I took part in this conference:

Ephemerality and Durability in Early Modern Visual and Material Culture

organised by the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH), at the University of Cambridge, and the University of Southern California-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute.

Lots of interesting papers on early modern material culture and the question of why certain “things” have survived and others have not.

Organisers
Jessica Keating, University of Southern California
Alexander Marr, University of Cambridge
Sean Roberts, University of Southern California

Programme:

Friday, September 27, 2013

9:00am Coffee

9:15am Welcome
Peter Mancall, Jessica Keating, and Sean Roberts

9:30am Panel I
Moderator: Sheryl Reiss, University of Southern California
Sean Roberts, University of Southern California
“Nature and Artifice in Botticelli’s Pallas and the Centaur”
Timothy McCall, Villanova University
“Ephemeral Phenomena and the Material Culture of Signorial Adornment and Array”

11:15am Panel II
Moderator: Stephanie Schrader, J. Paul Getty Museum
Elizabeth Upper, University of Cambridge
“Saving Waste: Artifacts of the Earliest Color-Printing Techniques”
Lucy Razzall, University of Cambridge
“‘Hail Holy Image’: Late Fifteenth-Century Woodcuts Pasted into Boxes”

12:45pm Lunch in Alumni Park

2:00pm Panel III
Moderator: Jacob Soll, University of Southern California
Melissa Calaresu, University of Cambridge
“Street food: Eating out in early modern Europe”
Mark Rosen, University of Texas, Dallas
“Freeing the Captives: Revolutionary Rhetoric and the Remaking of Royal Monuments”

4:00pm Keynote Lecture
Dale Kinney, Bryn Mawr
“The Stones of Rome”

Saturday, September 28, 2013

9:00am Coffee

9:00am Graduate Student Workshop

Moderator: Alexander Marr, University of Cambridge

Michelle Wallis, University of Cambridge
“Papering Over the Past – Ephemeral Print and the Early Modern History of Medicine, 1660-1720”
Respondent:  Penelope Geng, University of Southern California

Katy Barrett, University of Cambridge
“Bursting the Bubble: John Harrison’s longitude timekeepers between ephemerality and durability”
Respondent: Keith Pluymers, University of Southern California

Sophie Waring, University of Cambridge
“In pursuit of the ephemeral and durable: weights, measures and the figure of the earth”
Respondent: Nicholas Glisserman, University of Southern California

Lavinia Maddaluno, University of Cambridge
“Durable machines and ephemeral powers: politics and scientific practices of a late eighteenth-century Milanese mathematician”
Respondent: Jeremy Glatstein, University of Southern California

Suzanna Ivanic, University of Cambridge
“Meanings of Matter: Objects in the Kunstkammer of Rudolf II of Prague (1583-1612)”
Respondent: Lauren Dodds, University of Southern California

12:15 Lunch in DML 241

1:00pm Panel IV
Moderator: Jessica Keating, University of Southern California
Richard Serjeantson, University of Cambridge
“Investigating the Ephemeral in Seventeenth-Century Natural Philosophy”
J.K. Barret, University of Texas, Austin
“Imminent Futures: Ephemeral Legacy and Durable Form in Late Shakespeare”

2:30pm Panel V
Moderator: Sherry Velasco, University of Southern California
José Ramón Marcaida, University of Cambridge
“Don Juan de Espina and his chair:
Material culture and ephemerality in a 17th-century Spanish collection”
Emily Berquist, California State University, Long Beach
“Pictures without words, Objects without Bodies:
The Confounding “Codex” and Collections of Trujillo, Peru”

4:00pm Roundtable Discussion
Jessica Keating, University of Southern California
Sean Roberts, University of Southern California
Alexander Marr, University of Cambridge
Peter Mancall, University of Southern California
Dale Kinney, Bryn Mawr

 

About Jose Ramon Marcaida

I’m a historian of science interested in the history of early modern Iberian science and its connection with Renaissance and Baroque visual culture. More generally, I’m interested in the relation between texts, images and things across the Humanities.
This entry was posted in History of art, History of science, Public events, Visual culture and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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